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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2007, Article ID 90520, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/90520
Review Article

DNA Vaccines against Protozoan Parasites: Advances and Challenges

Laboratorio de Parasitología, Centro de Investigaciones Regionales “Dr. Hideyo Noguchi”, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Mérida, Yucatán 97000, Mexico

Received 8 December 2006; Accepted 21 March 2007

Academic Editor: Ali Ouaissi

Copyright © 2007 Eric Dumonteil. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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