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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2008, Article ID 597913, 30 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/597913
Review Article

Metabolic Control Analysis: A Tool for Designing Strategies to Manipulate Metabolic Pathways

Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología, Juan Badiano no. 1, Colonia Sección 16, Tlalpan, México DF 14080, Mexico

Received 1 October 2007; Revised 16 January 2008; Accepted 26 March 2008

Academic Editor: Daniel Howard

Copyright © 2008 Rafael Moreno-Sánchez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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