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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2009, Article ID 135249, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/135249
Review Article

Role of Ryanodine Receptor Subtypes in Initiation and Formation of Calcium Sparks in Arterial Smooth Muscle: Comparison with Striated Muscle

1Division of Nephrology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Charité Campus Virchow, 13353 Berlin, Germany
2Experimental and Clinical Research Center, 13125 Berlin, Germany

Received 22 June 2009; Accepted 22 September 2009

Academic Editor: Mohamed Boutjdir

Copyright © 2009 Kirill Essin and Maik Gollasch. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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