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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2009, Article ID 342032, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/342032
Research Article

Chlamydia trachomatis Alters Iron-Regulatory Protein-1 Binding Capacity and Modulates Cellular Iron Homeostasis in HeLa-229 Cells

Division of Microbiology/Tissue Culture, Institute of Pathology, Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Safdarjung Hospital Campus, New Delhi, Pin 110029, India

Received 26 March 2009; Accepted 8 June 2009

Academic Editor: Mark Smith

Copyright © 2009 Harsh Vardhan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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