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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 717941, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/717941
Research Article

Alterations in Adenylate Kinase Activity in Human PBMCs after In Vitro Exposure to Electromagnetic Field: Comparison between Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field (ELF) and Therapeutic Application of a Musically Modulated Electromagnetic Field (TAMMEF)

1TAMMEF Centre, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy
2Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrine-Metabolic Sciences and Biochemistry, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy

Received 12 March 2009; Revised 20 May 2009; Accepted 7 July 2009

Academic Editor: Richard Gomer

Copyright © 2009 Antonietta Albanese et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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