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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010, Article ID 174378, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/174378
Review Article

DNA Vaccines: Developing New Strategies against Cancer

1Institute of Neurobiology and Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, National Research Council (CNR), Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome, Italy
2Section of Molecular Medicine and Biotechnology, Interdisciplinary Center for Biomedical Research, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via Álvaro del Portillo 21, 00128 Rome, Italy
3Unità Operativa Oncologia, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, 71013 San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, Italy

Received 20 November 2009; Accepted 5 February 2010

Academic Editor: Soldano Ferrone

Copyright © 2010 Daniela Fioretti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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