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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 583691, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/583691
Review Article

Organogenic Nodule Formation in Hop: A Tool to Study Morphogenesis in Plants with Biotechnological and Medicinal Applications

1Plant Systems Biology Lab, ICAT, Center for Biodiversity and Functional Integrative Genomics, Science Faculty of Lisbon University, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
2Institute of Biology II/Botany, Faculty of Biology, Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, Schänzlestraße 1, 79104 Freiburg, Germany

Received 29 December 2009; Revised 14 June 2010; Accepted 28 June 2010

Academic Editor: Prem L. Bhalla

Copyright © 2010 Ana M. Fortes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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