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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 686457, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/686457
Review Article

Skeletal Dysplasias Associated with Mild Myopathy—A Clinical and Molecular Review

Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Matrix Research, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Michael Smith Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, UK

Received 9 February 2010; Accepted 15 March 2010

Academic Editor: Henk L. M. Granzier

Copyright © 2010 Katarzyna A. Piróg and Michael D. Briggs. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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