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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 828045, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/828045
Review Article

RNAi-Based Strategies for Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition in Cancer

Department of Experimental Biology, University of Bologna, Via Selmi 3, 40126 Bologna, Italy

Received 12 October 2009; Revised 18 March 2010; Accepted 8 April 2010

Academic Editor: Chung-Liang Chien

Copyright © 2010 Antonio Strillacci et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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