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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010, Article ID 864029, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/864029
Review Article

Bioinformatics in New Generation Flavivirus Vaccines

Department of Virology, Erasmus Medical Centre, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Received 2 October 2009; Revised 21 December 2009; Accepted 2 March 2010

Academic Editor: Yongqun Oliver He

Copyright © 2010 Penelope Koraka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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