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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 274578, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/274578
Research Article

Plant and Fungal Food Components with Potential Activity on the Development of Microbial Oral Diseases

1Department of Drug Sciences, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia, Italy
2DIP.TE.RIS., University of Genoa, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genoa, Italy
3Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 40530 Götegborg, Sweden
4Department of Microbial Diseases, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, 256 Gray's Inn Road, London WC1X 8LD, UK
5Sezione di Microbiologia, Dipartimento di Patologia e Diagnostica, Università di Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona, Italy
6Department of Preventive Dentistry, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Received 15 June 2011; Accepted 19 July 2011

Academic Editor: Carla Pruzzo

Copyright © 2011 Maria Daglia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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