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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012, Article ID 745181, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/745181
Research Article

Analysis of Casein Biopolymers Adsorption to Lignocellulosic Biomass as a Potential Cellulase Stabilizer

1Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, South Dakota State University, 1400 North Campus Drive, Brookings, SD 57007, USA
2Department of Biology and Microbiology, South Dakota State University, 1400 North Campus Drive, Brookings, SD 57007, USA

Received 23 May 2012; Accepted 3 July 2012

Academic Editor: Anuj K. Chandel

Copyright © 2012 Anahita Dehkhoda Eckard et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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