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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012, Article ID 782642, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/782642
Research Article

Camel Milk Modulates the Expression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Regulated Genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in Murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 Cells

1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, 11451 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2E1
3Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, 11461 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Received 6 September 2011; Revised 24 October 2011; Accepted 8 November 2011

Academic Editor: Ikhlas A. Khan

Copyright © 2012 Hesham M. Korashy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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