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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012, Article ID 789741, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/789741
Research Article

Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

1Centre de Biotecnologia Molecular, Departament d’Enginyeria Química, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
2Centre de Biotecnologia Molecular, Departament d’Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08222 Terrassa, Spain
3Laboratori de Medicina Computacional, Unitat de Bioestadistica, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain

Received 19 July 2011; Accepted 8 November 2011

Academic Editor: Alejandro Giorgetti

Copyright © 2012 Marlet Martinez-Archundia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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