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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 147064, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/147064
Research Article

Evolutionary Relations of Hexanchiformes Deep-Sea Sharks Elucidated by Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequences

1Department of Molecular Life Science, Division of Basic Medical Science and Molecular Medicine, Tokai University School of Medicine, 143 Shimokasuya, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1143, Japan
2Fisheries Science Center, The Hokkaido University Museum, 3-1-1 Minato-cho, Hakodate, Hokkaido 041-8611, Japan
3Division of Human Genetics, Department of Integrated Genetics, National Institute of Genetics, 1111 Yata, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540, Japan
4Division of Science Interpreter Training, Komaba Organization for Education Excellence College of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902, Japan
5Shimonoseki Marine Science Museum, 6-1 Arcaport, Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi 750-0036, Japan
6Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Division of Basic Clinical Science and Public Health, Tokai University School of Medicine, 143 Shimokasuya, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1143, Japan
7Centre for Forensic Science, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6008, Australia
8Department of Marine Biology, School of Marine Science and Technology, Tokai University, 3-20-1 Orido, Shimizu, Shizuoka 424-8610, Japan

Received 1 March 2013; Accepted 26 July 2013

Academic Editor: Dietmar Quandt

Copyright © 2013 Keiko Tanaka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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