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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 318471, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/318471
Research Article

Effects of DL-Homocysteine Thiolactone on Cardiac Contractility, Coronary Flow, and Oxidative Stress Markers in the Isolated Rat Heart: The Role of Different Gasotransmitters

1Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia
2Institute of Normal and Pathological Physiology and Centre of Excellence for Examination of Regulatory Role of Nitric Oxide in Civilization Diseases, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia
3Institute of Medical Physiology “Richard Burian”, Faculty of Medicine University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia

Received 7 June 2013; Revised 20 September 2013; Accepted 31 October 2013

Academic Editor: Zsolt Bagi

Copyright © 2013 Vladimir Zivkovic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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