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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 401417, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/401417
Research Article

Introducing a Method of In Vitro Testing of Different Anchoring Systems Used for Female Incontinence and Prolapse Surgery

1Department of Neuro-Urology, University Hospital, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-University, 53127 Bonn, Germany
2Institute of Bioengineering, FH Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Juelich Campus, 52428 Juelich, Germany
3Department of Surgery, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, 52074 Aachen, Germany

Received 21 June 2013; Revised 17 November 2013; Accepted 22 November 2013

Academic Editor: Guiming Liu

Copyright © 2013 Ralf Anding et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aims. To develop a method for in vitro testing to compare different intracorporeal anchoring systems (AS) used, for example, in single-incision slings or vaginal meshes. Intracorporeal fixation needs reliable anchorage systems, which keep the implant in the operative and early postoperative phase in place. Up to now, the impact of the design of current anchor systems and their capability to provide sufficient retention forces is not known. Methods. Four AS (“PelFix”, “Surelift”, “TFS”, and “MiniArc”) were evaluated in an animal model and a ballistic gelatine model with pull-out tests. We performed ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni. Results were presented as mean values whereby a significance level of <0.05 was considered significant. Results. The four systems showed significantly different pull-out forces. Depending on mesh structure, size, and form of the AS, mechanical strain resulted in deformation with local peak stresses. Under the condition of form stability, relative differences of pull-out forces did not change in different tissues. Conclusions. Reliable testing of different AS in their ability to keep mesh implants in place can be done in animal models and in especially designed ballistic gelatine. These methods of testing will help to modify AS in novel pelvic floor implants.