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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 438956, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/438956
Research Article

Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, 350 Minemachi, Utsunomiya 321-8505, Japan

Received 11 March 2013; Revised 26 June 2013; Accepted 23 July 2013

Academic Editor: Konstantinos Mavrommatis

Copyright © 2013 Isamu Maeda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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