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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 540231, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/540231
Research Article

Topical Application of Ketoprofen Improves Gait Disturbance in Rat Models of Acute Inflammation

1Cooperative Major in Advanced Health Science, Graduate School of Bio-Applications and System Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-8-5 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan
2Laboratories of Comparative Animal Medicine, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-8-5 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan
3Veterinary Molecular Pathology and Therapeutics, Division of Animal Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-8-5 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan

Received 4 April 2013; Accepted 11 July 2013

Academic Editor: Todd Vanderah

Copyright © 2013 Yosuke Amagai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Arthritis is a disabling health problem and commonly develops in the late stages of life; the condition is typically accompanied by chronic pain. For the assessment of pain severity and therapeutic effects of analgesic drugs, we recently developed a gait analysis system, which provides an index of pain severity based on walking stride disturbance. Using this system, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rat models of acute inflammation. We found that the gait analysis system is more sensitive than conventional evaluation methods, such as measurement of swelling or analgesia, which indicated the superiority of our system for drug screening. The approach also indicated that ketoprofen is superior to other NSAIDs for providing pain relief because of its higher skin permeability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the effectiveness of topical NSAIDs in experimental animal models of acute inflammation.