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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 749078, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/749078
Review Article

Potential Use of Atlantic Cod Trypsin in Biomedicine

1Department of Biochemistry, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik, Iceland
2Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences and Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik, Iceland

Received 6 December 2012; Revised 9 January 2013; Accepted 27 January 2013

Academic Editor: Bernd H. A. Rehm

Copyright © 2013 Ágústa Gudmundsdóttir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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