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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 752817, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/752817
Research Article

Interval and Continuous Exercise Training Produce Similar Increases in Skeletal Muscle and Left Ventricle Microvascular Density in Rats

1Laboratory of Cardiovascular Investigation, Oswaldo Cruz Institute, FIOCRUZ, 21040 900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Fluminense Federal University, 24210 130 Niterói, RJ, Brazil
3Laboratory of Exercise Sciences, Biomedical Institute, Fluminense Federal University, Rua Professor Hernani Pires de Mello 1001, Sala 106, 24210 130 Niterói, RJ, Brazil

Received 5 October 2013; Revised 20 October 2013; Accepted 22 October 2013

Academic Editor: Antonio Crisafulli

Copyright © 2013 Flávio Pereira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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