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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 802534, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/802534
Clinical Study

The Effect of NeuroMuscular Electrical Stimulation on Quadriceps Strength and Knee Function in Professional Soccer Players: Return to Sport after ACL Reconstruction

1Department of Physiotherapy Basics, Academy of Physical Education in Katowice, Mikolowska Street 72, 40-065 Katowice, Poland
2Department of Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Medykow Street 18, 40-752 Katowice, Poland
3Department of Physiotherapy, Public Higher Professional Medical School in Opole, Katowicka Street 68, 40-060 Opole, Poland
4Department of Descriptive and Topographic Anatomy, Medical University of Silesia in Zabrze, Jordana Street 19, 41-808 Zabrze, Poland
5Department of Physiotherapy, University of Medicine in Wroclaw, Grunwaldzka Street 2, 50-355 Wrocław, Poland
6Department of Nervous System Diseases, University of Medicine in Wroclaw, Bartla Street 5, 51-618 Wrocław, Poland
7Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Medicine in Wroclaw, Bartla Street 5, 51-618 Wrocław, Poland

Received 8 September 2013; Revised 9 October 2013; Accepted 13 November 2013

Academic Editor: Brad J. Schoenfeld

Copyright © 2013 J. Taradaj et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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