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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 826435, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/826435
Review Article

From Notochord Formation to Hereditary Chordoma: The Many Roles of Brachyury

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA

Received 21 December 2012; Accepted 22 February 2013

Academic Editor: Francesco Baudi

Copyright © 2013 Yutaka Nibu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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