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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 863860, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/863860
Research Article

Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Peritoneal Dialysate from Chronic Glomerulonephritis Patients

1Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan
2Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Chi-Mei Medical Center, 901 Chung-Hwa Road, Yung-Kang District, Tainan City 710, Taiwan
3Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717, Taiwan
4Department of Emergency Medicine, Chi-Mei Medical Center, 901 Chung-Hwa Road, Yung-Kang District, Tainan 710, Taiwan
5Department of Leisure, Recreation and Tourism Management, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan 710, Taiwan
6Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 710, Taiwan
7Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center, 901 Chung-Hwa Road, Yung-Kang District, Tainan 710, Taiwan
8Department of Food Nutrition, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan 717, Taiwan
9Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan 717, Taiwan
10Department of Sport Management, College of Leisure and Recreation Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717, Taiwan

Received 22 February 2013; Accepted 14 April 2013

Academic Editor: Shih-Bin Su

Copyright © 2013 Hsin-Yi Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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