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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 960292, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/960292
Research Article

Tobacco Use among Health Care Workers in Southwestern Saudi Arabia

1Department of Family & Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha 61421, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha 61421, Saudi Arabia
3Department of Chest Disease, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha 61421, Saudi Arabia

Received 5 April 2013; Revised 19 July 2013; Accepted 24 July 2013

Academic Editor: Nick Kontodimopoulos

Copyright © 2013 Ahmed A. Mahfouz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The present study targeted health care workers (HCWs) in Governmental Hospitals and Primary Health Care Centers in Abha City, southwestern Saudi Arabia. An anonymous self-report questionnaire was used to assess tobacco use and the reasons for smoking. The present study included 736 HCWs. The overall prevalence of tobacco use amounted to 26.3% (14.8% current and 11.5% former users). In a binary logistic regression analysis, males were found significantly more prone to smoke compared to females (aOR = 3.081, 95% CI: 2.004–4.739). Similarly, parental history of tobacco use was found to be a significant risk factor (aOR = 1.540, 95% CI: 1.040–2.278). Among current users, 89.9% were interested in quitting and 66.1% tried before to quit. The prevalence of smoking among HCWs in the present study, besides being a public health problem, represents a potential barrier in involving this group as a first line for tobacco control. There is a need for a national intervention programme in the country in a tailored manner for HCWs to control tobacco use parallel to the running national program for public. These interventions should begin early in basic medical education and to be applied continually during one’s medical career.