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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 125704, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/125704
Research Article

Inhibitory and Toxic Effects of Volatiles Emitted by Strains of Pseudomonas and Serratia on Growth and Survival of Selected Microorganisms, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster

1Institute of Molecular Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurchatov Square 2, Moscow 123182, Russia
2M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, A.N. Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology, Leninskie Gory 1-40, Moscow 119991, Russia
3State Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow 117545, Russia
4Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Street 32, Moscow 119991, Russia
5Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 76100 Rehovot, Israel

Received 25 February 2014; Revised 4 May 2014; Accepted 20 May 2014; Published 11 June 2014

Academic Editor: Heather Simpson

Copyright © 2014 Alexandra A. Popova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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