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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 126586, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/126586
Review Article

New Molecules and Old Drugs as Emerging Approaches to Selectively Target Human Glioblastoma Cancer Stem Cells

Section of Pharmacology, Department of Internal Medicine and Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research (CEBR), University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2 16132 Genova, Italy

Received 14 June 2013; Accepted 4 December 2013; Published 2 January 2014

Academic Editor: Kaisorn L. Chaichana

Copyright © 2014 Roberto Würth et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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