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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 135026, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/135026
Research Article

Circuit Models and Experimental Noise Measurements of Micropipette Amplifiers for Extracellular Neural Recordings from Live Animals

1State Key Laboratory of Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI, University of Macau, Taipa 999078, Macau
2Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Taipa 999078, Macau
3Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
4Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO 80217-3364, USA

Received 27 March 2014; Revised 5 June 2014; Accepted 6 June 2014; Published 16 July 2014

Academic Editor: Xiaoling Hu

Copyright © 2014 Chang Hao Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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