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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 153747, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/153747
Research Article

Bacteriological Profile and Drug Resistance Patterns of Blood Culture Isolates in a Tertiary Care Nephrourology Teaching Institute

Muljibhai Patel Urological Hospital and Society for Research in Nephro-Urology, Dr. V. V. Desai Road, Nadiad, Gujarat 387001, India

Received 29 December 2013; Revised 23 February 2014; Accepted 13 March 2014; Published 7 April 2014

Academic Editor: Vidya Mave

Copyright © 2014 Kalpesh Gohel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Blood stream infections can lead to life threatening sepsis and require rapid antimicrobial treatment. The organisms implicated in these infections vary with the geographical alteration. Infections caused by MDR organisms are more likely to increase the risk of death in these patients. The present study was aimed to study the profile of organisms causing bacteremia and understand antibiotic resistance patterns in our hospital. 1440 blood samples collected over a year from clinically suspected cases of bacteremia were studied. The isolates were identified by standard biochemical tests and antimicrobial resistance patterns were determined by CLSI guidelines. Positive blood cultures were obtained in 9.2% of cases of which Gram-positive bacteria accounted for 58.3% of cases with staph aureus predominance; gram negative bacteria accounted for 40.2% with enterobactereciea predominence; and 1.5% were fungal isolates. The most sensitive drugs for Gram-positive isolates were vancomycin, teicoplanin, daptomycin, linezolid, and tigecycline and for Gram-negative were carbapenems, colistin, aminoglycosides, and tigecycline. The prevalence of MRSA and vancomycin resistance was 70.6% and 21.6%, respectively. ESBL prevalence was 39.6%. Overall low positive rates of blood culture were observed.