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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 156987, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/156987
Research Article

Sinefungin, a Natural Nucleoside Analogue of S-Adenosylmethionine, Inhibits Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth

1Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 135-705, Republic of Korea
2Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi, Goyang 410-773, Republic of Korea

Received 5 February 2014; Revised 5 June 2014; Accepted 8 June 2014; Published 23 June 2014

Academic Editor: Meirong Zhao

Copyright © 2014 Mukesh Kumar Yadav et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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