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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 159459, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/159459
Research Article

Unique Pattern of Component Gene Disruption in the NRF2 Inhibitor KEAP1/CUL3/RBX1 E3-Ubiquitin Ligase Complex in Serous Ovarian Cancer

BC Cancer Research Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1L3

Received 11 February 2014; Accepted 26 May 2014; Published 9 July 2014

Academic Editor: Benjamin K. Tsang

Copyright © 2014 Victor D. Martinez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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