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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 167035, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/167035
Review Article

Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy

Received 20 February 2014; Revised 17 April 2014; Accepted 12 May 2014; Published 28 May 2014

Academic Editor: Sue-Hwa Lin

Copyright © 2014 Nadia Rucci and Adriano Angelucci. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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