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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 182029, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/182029
Research Article

Glioprotective Effects of Ashwagandha Leaf Extract against Lead Induced Toxicity

Department of Biotechnology, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab 143005, India

Received 13 February 2014; Revised 24 April 2014; Accepted 24 April 2014; Published 28 May 2014

Academic Editor: José Carlos Tavares Carvalho

Copyright © 2014 Praveen Kumar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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