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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 183248, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/183248
Research Article

Fear-Potentiated Behaviour Is Modulated by Central Amygdala Angiotensin II Receptors Stimulation

1Laboratory of Neuropharmacology, Institute of Biological and Technological Research (IIBYT-CONICET), National University of Córdoba, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, Catholic University of Córdoba, 5017 Córdoba, Argentina
2Laboratory of Neurosciences and Experimental Psychology, IMBECU-CONICET, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, National University of Cuyo, 5500 Mendoza, Argentina
3Institute of Experimental Pharmacology (IFEC-CONICET), Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, National University of Córdoba, 5000 Córdoba, Argentina

Received 26 February 2014; Accepted 14 April 2014; Published 9 June 2014

Academic Editor: Oliver von Bohlen und Halbach

Copyright © 2014 Maria de los Angeles Marinzalda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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