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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 210560, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/210560
Research Article

Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

1Unidad de Investigación Médica en Inmunología e Infectología, Hospital de Infectología “Dr. Daniel Méndez Hernández”, “La Raza”, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Avenida Jacarandas Esquina Vallejo S/N colonia La Raza, 02990 México, DF, Mexico
2Laboratorio de Biología Molecular, Hospital General de México, Secretaria de Salud (SS), Eje 2A Sur (Dr. Balmis) 148, Col. Doctores, Delegación Cuauhtémoc, 06726 México, DF, Mexico
3Unidad de Investigación Médica en Epidemiología Clínica, Hospital de Pediatría, Centro Médico Nacional (CMN) “Siglo XXI”, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Avenida Cuauhtémoc 330, Delegación Cuauhtémoc, 06720 México, DF, Mexico
4Servicio de Hematología, UMAE Hospital de Pediatría, Centro Médico Nacional (CMN) “Siglo XXI”, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Avenida Cuauhtémoc 330, Delegación Cuauhtémoc, 06720 México, DF, Mexico
5Departamento de Hemato-Oncología, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez, Secretaria de Salud (SS), Calle Doctor Márquez 162, Colonia Doctores, Delegación Cuauhtémoc, 06720 México, DF, Mexico
6Servicio de Hematología Pediátrica, Hospital General “Gaudencio González Garza”, Centro Médico Nacional (CMN) “La Raza”, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Calzada Vallejo y Jacarandas S/N Colonia La Raza, Delegación Azcapotzalco, 02990 México, DF, Mexico
7Servicio de Hematología Pediátrica, Hospital General Regional “Carlos McGregor Sánchez Navarro”, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Avenida Gabriel Mancera No. 222, Colonia Del Valle, 03100 México, DF, Mexico
8Servicio de Onco-Pediatría, Hospital Juárez de México, Secretaria de Salud (SS), Avenida Instituto Politécnico Nacional 5160, Colonia Magdalena de las Salinas, Delegación Gustavo A. Madero, 07760 México, DF, Mexico
9Servicio de Hematología Pediátrica, CMN “20 de Noviembre”, Instituto de Seguridad Social al Servicio de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE), Félix Cuevas 540, Colonia Del Valle, Delegación Benito Juárez, 03229 México, DF, Mexico
10Servicio de Hematología Pediátrica, Hospital General de México, Secretaria de Salud (SS), Eje 2A Sur (Dr. Balmis) 148, Col. Doctores, Delegación Cuauhtémoc, 06726 México, DF, Mexico
11Servicio de Oncología Pediátrica, Hospital Pediátrico de Moctezuma, Secretaria de Salud del DF (SSDF), Oriente 158-189, Colonia Moctezuma 2a Sección, Delegación Venustiano Carranza, 15530 México, DF, Mexico
12Laboratorio de la Coordinación de Vigilancia Epidemiológica y Apoyo en Contingencias, Unidad de Investigación Médica en Inmunología e Infectología, Hospital de Infectología “Dr. Daniel Méndez Hernández”, “La Raza”, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Calzada Vallejo y Jacarandas S/N Colonia La Raza, Delegación Azcapotzalco, 02990 México, DF, Mexico
13Coordinación de Investigación en Salud, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Avenida Cuauhtémoc 330, 4to Piso Edificio de la Academia Nacional de Medicina, 06720 México, DF, Mexico

Received 10 February 2014; Revised 3 June 2014; Accepted 23 June 2014; Published 17 July 2014

Academic Editor: Richard J. Q. McNally

Copyright © 2014 Vilma Carolina Bekker-Méndez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child’s diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children.