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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 243280, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/243280
Research Article

A Functional Polymorphism of the MAOA Gene Modulates Spontaneous Brain Activity in Pons

1The Medical Psychological Institute of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011, China
2Department of Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
3Center for Functional Neuroimaging, Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
4Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510275, China

Received 12 March 2014; Revised 13 May 2014; Accepted 14 May 2014; Published 25 May 2014

Academic Editor: Yong He

Copyright © 2014 Hui Lei et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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