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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 243825, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/243825
Research Article

Morphological Changes in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus of Aging Female Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

1Laboratory of Neurochemical Studies, Physiology Department, Biosciences Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil
2Laboratory of Chronobiology, Physiology Department, Biosciences Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil
3Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory, Department of Biophysics and Pharmacology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil
4Biology Department, Federal University of Sergipe, Aracaju, SE, Brazil
5Laboratory of Neuroanatomy, Morphology Department, Biosciences Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil

Received 26 December 2013; Revised 4 April 2014; Accepted 18 April 2014; Published 2 June 2014

Academic Editor: Estela Muñoz

Copyright © 2014 Rovena Clara G. J. Engelberth et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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