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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 254698, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/254698
Research Article

Genetic Multipartitions Based on D-Loop Sequences and Chromosomal Patterns in Brown Chromis, Chromis multilineata (Pomacentridae), in the Western Atlantic

1Departamento de Biologia Celular e Genética, Centro de Biociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59078-970 Natal, RN, Brazil
2Centro de Investigaciones Marinas, Universidad de la Habana, Calle 16, No. 114, 11300 Habana, Cuba
3Departamento de Genética e Evolução, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luís, Km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP, Brazil

Received 20 May 2014; Revised 21 July 2014; Accepted 20 August 2014; Published 19 October 2014

Academic Editor: Barbara Mantovani

Copyright © 2014 Inailson Márcio Costa da Cunha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Connectivity levels among Brazilian reef fish fauna populations have attracted growing interest, mainly between mainland shores and oceanic islands. The Pomacentridae, whose phylogeographic patterns are largely unknown in the Atlantic, are a family of dominant fish in reef regions. We present data on the variability and population structure of damselfish Chromis multilineata in different areas along the northeast coast of Brazil and in the waters around the oceanic islands of Fernando de Noronha (FNA) and Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago (SPSPA) through analysis of the HVR1 mtDNA sequence of the control region. The remote SPSPA exhibits the highest level of genetic divergence among populations. Conventional and molecular cytogenetic analysis showed similar karyotype patterns (2n = 48 acrocentrics) between these insular areas. Our estimates reveal three genetically different population groups of C. multilineata on the Brazilian coast. The level of genetic structure is higher than previous data suggested, indicating complex panel of interactions between the oceanic island and coastal populations of Brazil.