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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 291280, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/291280
Research Article

A Systematic Analysis of miRNA-mRNA Paired Variations Reveals Widespread miRNA Misregulation in Breast Cancer

1Department of General Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086, China
2Department of Bioinformatics, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081, China
3Department of Internal Medicine, Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150040, China

Received 16 March 2014; Accepted 16 April 2014; Published 18 May 2014

Academic Editor: Zhixi Su

Copyright © 2014 Lei Zhong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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