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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 298020, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/298020
Review Article

Apocynin, a Low Molecular Oral Treatment for Neurodegenerative Disease

1Department of Immunobiology, Biomedical Primate Research Centre, Lange Kleiweg 161, 2288 GJ Rijswijk, The Netherlands
2Department of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands

Received 7 May 2014; Revised 10 July 2014; Accepted 11 July 2014; Published 22 July 2014

Academic Editor: Yiying Zhang

Copyright © 2014 Bert A. ‘t Hart et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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