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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 301294, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/301294
Research Article

Cecropia pachystachya: A Species with Expressive In Vivo Topical Anti-Inflammatory and In Vitro Antioxidant Effects

1Laboratory of Bioactive Natural Products, Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, 36036 900 Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil
2Department of Morphology, Biological Sciences Institute, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, 36036 900 Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil

Received 18 February 2014; Accepted 11 April 2014; Published 30 April 2014

Academic Editor: Fátima Ribeiro-Dias

Copyright © 2014 Natália Ramos Pacheco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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