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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 340216, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/340216
Research Article

Gla-Rich Protein Is a Potential New Vitamin K Target in Cancer: Evidences for a Direct GRP-Mineral Interaction

1Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
2GenoGla Diagnostics, Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), University of Algarve, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
3VitaK, Maastricht University, 6229 EV Maastricht, The Netherlands
4Algarve Medical Centre, Department of Histopathology, 8000-386 Faro, Portugal
5Lisbon Central Hospital-CHLC, Department of Dermatology, 1169-050 Lisbon, Portugal
6Administração Regional de Saúde do Algarve, 8135-014 Faro, Portugal
7Private Hospitals of Portugal, HPP-Santa Maria Hospital, 8000-140 Faro, Portugal

Received 24 January 2014; Accepted 8 April 2014; Published 18 May 2014

Academic Editor: Kunikazu Tsuji

Copyright © 2014 Carla S. B. Viegas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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