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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 372901, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/372901
Review Article

Contribution of Crk Adaptor Proteins to Host Cell and Bacteria Interactions

1Department of Microbiology, Medical School, Complutense University of Madrid, Avenida de la Complutense sn, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2Kansas State University, 1600 Denison Avenue, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA

Received 24 July 2014; Accepted 14 September 2014; Published 25 November 2014

Academic Editor: Alfredo Torres

Copyright © 2014 Narcisa Martinez-Quiles et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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