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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 380398, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/380398
Research Article

KCTD11 Tumor Suppressor Gene Expression Is Reduced in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

1Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio, Coppito 2, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
2Department of Pathology, San Salvatore Hospital, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
3Department of Molecular Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Via Regina Elena 291, 00161 Rome, Italy

Received 7 February 2014; Revised 28 April 2014; Accepted 29 April 2014; Published 19 June 2014

Academic Editor: Giovanni Luca Gravina

Copyright © 2014 Francesca Zazzeroni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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