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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 384896, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/384896
Research Article

Concurrent Validity of Physiological Cost Index in Walking over Ground and during Robotic Training in Subacute Stroke Patients

Santa Lucia Foundation, I.R.C.C.S., Via Ardeatina 306, 00179 Rome, Italy

Received 17 January 2014; Revised 10 April 2014; Accepted 23 April 2014; Published 19 May 2014

Academic Editor: Cordula Werner

Copyright © 2014 Anna Sofia Delussu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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