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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 390601, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/390601
Review Article

Progress and Prospects in Human Genetic Research into Age-Related Hearing Impairment

1Department of Otolaryngology, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1195, Japan
2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi 474-8511, Japan
3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550, Japan

Received 29 January 2014; Accepted 26 June 2014; Published 22 July 2014

Academic Editor: Johan H. M. Frijns

Copyright © 2014 Yasue Uchida et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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