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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 391528, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/391528
Research Article

Induction of Epoxide Hydrolase, Glucuronosyl Transferase, and Sulfotransferase by Phenethyl Isothiocyanate in Male Wistar Albino Rats

1Food Safety Research Centre (FOSREC), Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
2Department of Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
3School of Agro-Industry, Mae Fah Luang University, 333 Moo1 Thasud Muang, Chiang Rai 57100, Thailand

Received 12 September 2013; Revised 2 November 2013; Accepted 2 November 2013; Published 27 January 2014

Academic Editor: Lillian Barros

Copyright © 2014 Ahmad Faizal Abdull Razis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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