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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 395803, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/395803
Research Article

Maternal Body Mass Index and Risk of Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, 581 85 Linköping, Sweden

Received 26 February 2014; Accepted 2 April 2014; Published 15 April 2014

Academic Editor: Sohinee Bhattacharya

Copyright © 2014 Marie Blomberg. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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