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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 401326, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/401326
Research Article

Contribution of Psychological Factors in Dropping out from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Rehabilitation Programs

1Psychiatric Department, “Sotiria” General Hospital of Chest Disease, Mesogeion 152, 11527 Athens, Greece
2Pulmonary Rehabilitation Centre, “Sotiria” General Hospital of Chest Disease, Mesogeion 152, 11527 Athens, Greece
3Endocrinology Department, “Elena Venizelou” Hospital, 11521 Athens, Greece
4Department of Thoracic Medicine, Medical School, University of Crete, 71 003 Heraklion, Greece
5Laboratory of Epidemiology, Department of Social Medicine, Medical School, University of Crete, 71 003 Heraklion, Greece

Received 29 September 2013; Revised 31 December 2013; Accepted 4 January 2014; Published 13 February 2014

Academic Editor: Mitja Lainscak

Copyright © 2014 Athanasios Tselebis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Significant positive effects, particularly on psychological state in patients who completed the follow-up pulmonary rehabilitation programs, are indicated by a large number of studies. Yet, a remarkable proportion of selected patients drop out from these programs. In this study, we investigated existing differences on psychological variables among COPD patients who complete and those who drop out from pulmonary rehabilitation programs. The study included 144 patients, 43 (29.9%) of whom did not complete the program. SCL-90 was used for the assessment of psychological symptoms. On the SCL-90-R scale 55.6% of patients had abnormal findings. Patients who discontinued the program had higher rates of depression and somatization compared to those who completed it. Regarding the psychopathology scales of SCL-90R, we found that patients who discontinued the program showed higher levels of psychopathology on the scales of somatization, depression, paranoid ideation, and psychotism compared to those who completed the program. The final regression model showed that patients with low educational status and psychotism were more likely to leave the program. In conclusion, psychopathology contributes to patients dropping out from a COPD rehabilitation program; thus, psychological assessment prior to inclusion in rehabilitation programs may reduce dropouts.