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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 406960, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/406960
Review Article

Roles of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Vascular Dysfunction in Hypertension

Vascular Biology & Immunopharmacology Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia

Received 11 April 2014; Accepted 20 June 2014; Published 20 July 2014

Academic Editor: Tomasz Guzik

Copyright © 2014 Quynh N. Dinh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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